Performance Results Of ZeroWater’s 5-Stage Filter vs. conventional 2-Stage Filter for Inorganic Chemicals as listed under the EPA’s National Primary Drinking Water Regulations and Contaminants listed under the EPA’s Secondary Drinking Water Standards.1

METALS

 

ZeroWater®

20 Gallons Filtered*
40 Gallons Filtered**

LEADING CONVENTIONAL

20 Gallons Filtered*
40 Gallons Filtered**
Antimony
99%
96%
99%
80%
Arsenic III
98%
85%
63%
55%
Arsenic V
98%
93%
94%
87%
Barium
99.9%
99.9%
96%
91%
Beryllium
97%
97%
94%
73%
Cadmium
97%
97%
97%
97%
Chromium 3
98%
94%
93%
78%
Chromium 6
99%
99%
93%
67%
Copper
99.9%
99.9%
93%
88%
Iron
99.9%
99.9%
99%
99%
Lead
99%
99%
85%
63%
Manganese
99%
99%
49%
22%
Mercury
92%
91%
92%
87%
Selenium
99%
98%
79%
54%
Silver
99.9%
96%
37%
14%
Thallium
99%
98%
91%
88%
Zinc
99.9%
99.9%
95%
95%

INORGANIC NON-METALS

 

ZeroWater®

20 Gallons Filtered*
40 Gallons Filtered**

LEADING CONVENTIONAL

20 Gallons Filtered*
40 Gallons Filtered**
Asbestos
99%
98%
89%
58%
Chlorine
99%
99%
95%
89%
Cyanide
99.9%
99%
85%
77%
Fluoride
99%
91%
3%
2%
Nitrate
98%
78%
48%
47%
Nitrite
99%
88%
93%
92%

1Test results based on NSF/ANSI testing standards of pour through devices as performed by Quality Filter Testing Laboratory, LLC, located in Williamstown, New Jersey, an independent ISO 17025 laboratory recognized by IAPMO.

ZeroWater’s 5-stage filter with a rated capacity of 20 Gallons and Brita’s 2-Stage Standard Filter with a rated capacity of 40 Gallons were tested in accordance with the products’ recommended daily usage of 2 gallons of filtration per day. Results shown are based on an averaged calculation of each filter’s test results of drinking water at a pH level of 6.5 and pH level of 8.5.

*% reduction after 20 Gallons of Filtration

**% reduction after 40 Gallons of Filtration

Brita® is a registered trademark of Brita®, L.P, which is not affiliated with Zero Technologies, LLC.

Challenge Water Preparation:

The Metals challenge water was prepared by adding the appropriate amount of reagent standard to 20 Liters of water to get a concentration stated by the NSF/ANSI standard 42 or 53 for each metals, except for those metals that are not included in the NSF/ANSI standard, these metals were prepared 10 times the concentration of the EPA drinking water limit for that particular metal. The challenge water was passed through each filter, side by side, at a rate of 1 liter, 45 minutes load/45 minutes rest, and a filtered water sample was taken from each filter after 20 liters and tested for each metal using the EPA method 200.8 except for Iron that was tested using SM 3111-B. Adjusted the pH to 6.5 and 8.5 for all contaminants and the average of the two results was reported for each metal.

The Inorganic-Non-Metals- Parameters challenge water was prepared by adding the appropriate amount of reagent standard to 20 Liters of water to get a concentration stated by the NSF/ANSI standard 42 or 53 for each parameter, except for those parameters that are not included in the NSF/ANSI standard, these parameters were prepared 10 times the concentration of the EPA drinking water limit for that particular parameter. The challenge water was passed through each filter, side by side, at a rate of 1 liter, 45 minutes load/45 minutes rest, a filtered water sample was taken from each filter after 20 liters and tested for each parameter along with the challenge water using the respective EPA method, or Standard Method for the Examination of Water.

Summary:

The compounds tested are compounds listed by EPA as Primary and Secondary drinking water contaminants. The compounds tested are also listed by the NSF/ANSI Standard 53 and Standard 42 with established procedures for filter manufactures reduction claims. The procedure used in this comparison study were based on the NSF/ANSI standards 42 and 53, 2018 editions. The methods of analysis used in this study are EPA approved methods for drinking water.